Blake Edwards

"Blake Edwards is one of the few filmmakers from the late classical period of American movies (the late 1940s and 1950s) to survive and prosper through the 1980s. If anything, Edwards's work has deepened with the passing decades, though it no longer bears much resemblance to the norms and styles of contemporary Hollywood. Edwards is an isolated figure, but a vital one." - Dave Kehr & Audrey E. Kupferberg (The St. James Film Directors Encyclopaedia, 1998)

Blake Edwards

Director / Screenwriter / Producer
(1922-2010) Born July 26, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
Top 250 Directors

Key Production Countries: USA, UK
Key Genres: Comedy, Farce, Sex Comedy, Slapstick, Romantic Comedy, Crime Comedy, Romance, Comedy of Manners, Comedy Drama, Spy Film, Musical, Detective Film
Key Collaborators: Henry Mancini (Composer), Ralph E. Winters (Editor), Tony Adams (Producer), Rodger Maus (Production Designer), Julie Andrews (Leading Actress), Peter Sellers (Leading Actor), Philip Lathrop (Cinematographer), Fernando Carrere (Production Designer), Graham Stark (Character Actor), André Maranne (Character Actor), Herbert Lom (Leading Actor), Frank Waldman (Screenwriter)

“One hangs on to the likings of one's youth and loyalties to stars and directors whose work caught one's attention at that formative time. However, this American director has long since lost me, his career shored up by the continuing box-office success of the Pink Panther films, and the fortuitous, Bo Derek-inspired success of the tedious 10.” - David Quinlan (Quinlan's Film Directors, 1999)
"Despite a variable career, Blake Edwards has directed some of the most successful comedies in Hollywood history. Born into a family with Hollywood connections - his grandfather directed silent star Theda Bara - Edwards broke into the industry as an actor, appearing in The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), amongst others… The early 1960s saw him established as a director, with a diverse series of glamorous, big-budget features." - Richard Armstrong (The Rough Guide to Film, 2007)
"Edwards reached a peak of success in the late 50s and early 60s with parallel triumphs in both television and films. For TV he created the popular series Peter Gunn (1958-60), Mr. Lucky (1959-60), and Dante (1960-61). For the big screen he directed a diverse number of superior productions: the service farce Operation Petticoat, the romantic comedy Breakfast at Tiffany's, the suspenseful thriller Experiment in Terror, the bleak social drama Days of Wine and Roses, and the hilarious Inspector Clouseau spoofs The Pink Panther and A Shot in the Dark. But in 1965, following the expensive debacle of the slapstick extravaganza The Great Race, Edwards's career began a decade-long slide at the box office and in the review columns." - The Film Encyclopedia, 2012
"As a director of comedy, Edwards can successfully blend slapstick, borscht-circuit humor, and sophisticated wit into an enticing brew (The Pink Panther, 64; Breakfast at Tiffany's, 61; The Party, 68). His suspense films (Experiment in Terror, 62; Gunn, 67) are fraught with tingling suspense and psychosis." - William R. Meyer (The Film Buff's Catalog, 1978)
"His career is marked not only by its diversity but also by his desire for creative control over his work in highly collaborative media. He considers himself primarily a writer but, to maintain creative control, has assumed the roles of director and producer on many of his projects… His work has been internationally respected for decades. Its quality was praised by writers like Jean-Luc Godard at Cahiers du cinéma in France in the late 1950s and is still honoured at international film festivals." - Peter Lehman & William Luhr (Contemporary North American Film Directors, 2002)
"In the 1960s, Andrew Sarris wrote that Edwards "is one writer-director who has got some of his biggest laughs out of jokes that are too gruesome for most horror films." Today, Edwards is still mining the pain from slapstick, and though his track record is erratic, the style is uniquely his own." - Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia, 1995
"Almost the whole of Blake Edwards' career is built on the Pink Panther movies and a number of bittersweet comedies starring his wife, Julie Andrews. Among the first films Blake Edwards directed was This Happy Feeling (1958), a title that sums up much of his work." - Ronald Bergan (Film - Eyewitness Companions, 2006)
TSPDT Guide
Recommended
Experiment in Terror (1962) ✖︎, Wild Rovers (1971)
Worth a Look
Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961) , The Pink Panther (1963), A Shot in the Dark (1964), The Party (1968) , Darling Lili (1970), The Carey Treatment (1972), The Return of the Pink Panther (1975), The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976), Skin Deep (1989)
Approach with Caution
Operation Petticoat (1959), Days of Wine and Roses (1962), The Great Race (1965), The Tamarind Seed (1974), S.O.B. (1981), Victor/Victoria (1982), Micki + Maude (1984), Switch (1991)
Not Recommended
10 (1979), Blind Date (1987)
Acclaimed Films / IMDB Filmography
1,000 Greatest Films ✖︎ 1,000 Noir Films
Amazon Products
Films / Books
    Breakfast at Tiffany
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